Olbia

The town of Olbia has 60,000 inhabitants, and is now the main gateway for those arriving in north-eastern Sardinia.

 
Sea and beaches in Olbia.


Olbia is considered the town of the future on the island, thanks to its rapid expansion in both the industrial and tourist sectors. The growth in population reflects the fact that in recent decades the area has welcomed many visitors who stay here for business purposes. The Olbia area offers numerous opportunities for work, especially during the summer season, thanks to the presence of the port, the airport, and much more. Indeed, the town and its surroundings have many well-organised tourist facilities, accommodating large numbers of people from all parts of the world. 

 

The charming town of Olbia overlooks the Gulf of the same name: famous for its deep waters which can accommodate large ships from all over the world, making the port a regular stop on the international cruise circuit.

 
Bocca Island Lighthouse


The coast around Olbia has been visited since ancient times by sailors from North Africa and the East, who left their homelands in search of new trading links. Recent excavations in the ancient harbour have revealed evidence of such visitors dating back to the 7th century B.C.

 
Pedres Castle in Olbia

 

The town of Olbia is situated in the historical and geographical region of Gallura, a place with a unique cultural identity and characterised by a granite landscape of singular beauty. Mediterranean scrub woodland alternates with vineyards and a variety of crops, creating a special and magical landscape.

The territory of Olbia has been inhabited since the Neolithic period of around 4000 B.C., as demonstrated by the discovery of pottery fragments and figurines representing the Mother Goddess. From the Middle Bronze Age onwards, the fascinating Nuragic civilization also began to develop in the Olbia area: about 50 Nuragic settlements have been found, including holy wells and the evocative tombs of the giants.

Like other parts of Sardinia, Olbia was visited by the Phoenician and Punic peoples. However, Olbia is distinguished from the rest of the island by the presence of Greeks, who probably gave the city its name: "Olbia" may well derive from an Ancient Greek word meaning "Happy".

When the Romans occupied Sardinia in 238 BC, Olbia also became a commercial and military hub, and thanks to trade the town soon expanded, experiencing a period of prosperity and becoming one of the most important centres for the Roman Empire. A very important period in the history of the city was its time as a Giudicato (district governed by a judge). Indeed, Olbia became the capital of the Giudicato of Gallura and also the first bishopric.

 
Pink Flamingos

 

The city certainly deserves careful exploration, for it contains sights of great cultural interest. We recommend a visit to the Romanesque basilica of St. Simplicio, one of the most important and ancient monuments on the island, and also a tour of the archaeological museum. This houses an interesting collection of items, discovered during excavations in and around the town.

Our Group is based in the town of Olbia. Contact us for all your transportation needs, we are always happy to help you.